• FONT SIZE

Class of 2017

At Havergal College, we offer our students the opportunity to excel in academics, arts, athletics and leadership. When you look at the 109 students in the 2017 graduating class, it is clear that these future leaders have the tools they need to succeed, whatever their passions. They have earned scholarships, created dynamic visionary projects, led their teams to victory and transformed the Havergal experience into unique versions of excellence.

 

Meet Some of our Graduates

Claire Dirks

Claire Dirks

Yale University, Economics

Joining Havergal’s Rowing team in Grade 9 changed the course of Claire’s life: “I used to be interested in soccer, until I discovered rowing,” she says. She was co-captain of the team in her senior year before being recruited to the Women’s Crew at Yale, where she is currently studying Economics. When not rowing, studying mathematics or giving a tour to prospective families as Admission Prefect, Claire could be found participating in some of Havergal’s many co-curricular opportunities, such as the Sign Language Club, the Games Club and the Kakuma Girls community partnership (a pen pal program in which students are paired with girls living in a refugee camp in Kenya). Claire feels drawn to leadership opportunities because she likes to challenge herself and work on different skills such as public speaking and community service. “I was eager to attend Havergal because of all of the leadership and athletic opportunities.”

 

Keeley Douglas

Keely Douglas

University of Pennsylvania, Biochemistry and Life Sciences

“I’ve always been interested in writing, reporting and journalism,” explains Keely, who was Editor-in-Chief of Havergal’s newspaper, Behind the Ivy, in her senior year. Inspired by the English department, Keely enjoys using creative writing to convey scientific concepts and hopes to use visual arts to promote scientific literacy in the future. Currently, she is focussing her studies on biochemistry at the University of Pennsylvania. Her interest in the medical field was sparked in Grade 9 as a volunteer at Women’s College Hospital, helping patients prepare for appointments and working with medical files. In the summer of 2016, she was an intern at Stanford University’s cardiothoracic surgery department. “I learned anatomy and practiced surgical procedures such as coronary artery bypass procedures and aortic valve transplants on the hearts of pigs,” she explains. Keely also interned at a research incubator in its early stages at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, with the goal of bridging the gap between clinical research and traditional academic research. “The teachers at Havergal showed me that it’s possible to be passionate about both science and humanities. I have the confidence to make a connection in these areas that can have impact on the scientific world.”

 

Charmaine Koo

Charmaine Koo

University of Waterloo, Biomedical Engineering

With a combined total of $106,000 offered to her in scholarships and bursaries at various schools, Charmaine had a lot to think about when choosing which university program to join. She decided to pursue a degree in the Biomedical Engineering program at the University of Waterloo because of the co-op opportunities and the program’s small student body (only 50 to 55 students are accepted annually). “I couldn’t decide between science and engineering; biomedical engineering is a hybrid of the two fields and I like the opportunities it opens up for my future,” she explains. An oboe and piano player, Charmaine was involved in five of Havergal’s music ensembles and was the Head of the Senior and Chamber Choirs. She was also Head of Music Connect, a community partnership in which students would perform songs for patients living with Alzheimer’s and dementia. As an athlete, Charmaine received the Caney Cup in her senior year at Havergal for leadership in swimming. Outside of school, she volunteered at Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital in Toronto, where she assisted with swimming lessons, led music therapy groups and participated in therapeutic recreation with the patients. “My time at Havergal helped me discover who I want to be and the encouraging environment made me feel comfortable trying anything.”

 

Coco Wang

Coco Wang

University of Pennsylvania, The Wharton School of Business, Engineering and Finance

By Grade 12, Coco had amazing accomplishments on her resume, including her year as CEO of Target Alpha, an online stock trading platform that gives students the opportunity to trade in a risk-free environment. “With more than 650 student members across Canada, we were very excited that 60 schools in Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario are now using Target Alpha’s curriculum,” she explains of the success of the non-profit, student-run organization. Coco was also the lead of Havergal’s DECA Business Club and was involved in many co-curricular opportunities, including the Middle School play, the community partnership Best Buddies (in which students are paired with young people living with intellectual disabilities), the Badminton team, the Math Club and Student Council. In her senior year, she was elected Junior School Prefect, leading the youngest students at Havergal in school spirit. Coco is currently working toward a dual degree in Systems Engineering and Finance at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business. She was the recipient of the J. Herbert Mason Medal for the 2016-17 school year (Havergal’s highest honour), which she received at graduation.

 

Sidney Wilson

Sidney Wilson

Stanford University, Liberal Arts

A volleyball enthusiast, Sidney was thrilled to join the Stanford University Varsity Women’s Volleyball team in her freshman year. “Competing on an NCAA team is an exciting challenge,” Sidney says. As a member of Havergal’s U20 Volleyball team, she was elated when the team won gold at OFSAA. Her interests in athletics go beyond the court: Sidney is a keen advocate for women in sports and developed statistical algorithms for female athletes by studying NHL and collegiate women’s hockey teams. With these stats, she hopes that athletes, coaches and recruiters can better determine a female player’s future success on a team. “The work that I’ve been doing in statistics and sports comes from the sense of empowerment and confidence that Havergal has helped me develop over the years,” she says. During her time in the Upper School, Sidney also worked with the Forum for Change to develop a non-profit project called GotLEGO in which donation boxes were set up at independent schools to collect LEGO for children at women’s shelters and homework clubs across the city. “LEGO was a big part of my childhood and taught me so many skills, such as engineering, architecture and creativity,” she explains. “I wanted to share this learning tool with kids who are less fortunate.”

 

Erin Wong

Erin Wong

Harvard University, Liberal Arts

“Music and sports were a big part of my experience at Havergal,” says Erin, School Captain for the 2016-17 school year. She started playing the cello in the Junior School in Grade 5 and was involved in various orchestras and choirs throughout her 12 years at Havergal. In Grade 11, she and some friends formed the band Piggy Goes Wild in which she sang and played guitar. When not performing, she was challenging herself athletically on the Cross Country and Swim teams. “The personal challenge is the most rewarding part,” she recalls. Self-awareness and expression are important for Erin, which prompted her and a classmate to host forums for Havergal community members to express their opinions and knowledge on a variety of topics, including self-confidence, mental illness, the dangers of voluntourism, vegetarianism, living your values, hypocrisy and politics, to name a few. “Students at Havergal are so bright and we wanted to create more opportunities for us to learn from each other. Our events allowed Havergal community members to share their thoughts, experiences, opinions and commentary about the world,” Erin explains.

 

View as a PDF